mahesh Gangurde Digital Marketing


While Trying To Find Information About Google Panda-Penguin, Somewhere I Fear That Due To This Updates My Favorite Subject  SEO IS DEAD, Or There Is No More Importance For Our Keywords In SEO.
But Its Not So. Thanks For Google...
Google’s saying there’s nothing new or different SEOs or publishers need to worry about. Guidance remains the same, it says: have original, high-quality content. Signals that have been important in the past remain important; Hummingbird just allows Google to process them in new and hopefully better ways.
The change aimed to lower the rank of "low-quality sites" or "thin sites", and return higher-quality sites near the top of the search results
Currently, we type our question into the search engine and the algorithm chooses words from it, often sending us by bringing up links that have those specific words in them rather than finding links that relate to the context of the overall query.
The name of Google’s new search algorithm is called “Hummingbird”. Derived from being “precise and fast”, it’s been the biggest change in Google’s search algorithm since the Caffeine update in 2010.
the Hummingbird will take a search engine query using long-tailed keywords and try to decipher (decode, interpret, translate, work out) the context of the question rather than chase the specific keywords within the question.
For example, you could ask, “What’s the nearest Mobile Store from my home?” The traditional search engine will most probably focus on finding matches for your keywords like “Mobile” or “Store”, and then lead you to a website owned by a shops that sells mobile but may not be necessarily close to your home.
Hummingbird makes Google almost human with the way it responds to queries. Instead of looking at keywords, Hummingbird makes Google look deeper and focus on the whole statement or question.
In relation to the example above, the new update helps the search engine understand that you’re looking for a physical store near your area of residence that sells mobiles, provided that you use the Google domain based in your country.
In a nutshell, Google responds to whole statements and questions in a way similar to how a human being would by looking at the query as a whole, and not segmenting its keywords. This then makes the results to match the query better since it looks for concepts, not words.

The Hummingbird algorithm responds to end users by means of processing the whole statements or questions, and then looks for websites or webpages that has the most relevant concept to the query.
But how does Hummingbird do this exactly?
Hummingbird applies a statistical language approach in a way that it rewrites search queries to make it simpler. This can be done by browsing the large database of synonyms or other related terms that might be substituted in place of one or more terms in the query.
If a query indicates, “Where is the best place to buy burgers?”, Google will most likely try to find a substitute for the terms “best”, “place”, “buy”, and “burgers”. The words “where”, “is”, “the”, and “to” would require no substitutes since they hold no great significance – these words are called “skip words”.
The synonyms that are stored in the database were created through observation of what end users search for in their queries. If an end user, for example, submitted two consecutive queries, the words he sent will give the hint that the words are related to the ones sent in the previous one.
To illustrate, when an end user searches for “Indian idol” and then “Indian star”, Google will understand that the word “idol” and “star” are of the same context.
It was mentioned above that there are some words that Google doesn’t bother finding synonyms of. That’s because keeping synonyms of words takes up a lot of space in their database. Moreover, relevant search results can still be produced without the use of some words. Queries like “The mp3 player” and “mp3 player” would most likely have the same results. Processing the latter would be less time consuming because Google only has to find alternatives for the terms “mp3” and “player”.
Does this mean SEO is dead?
No, SEO is not yet again dead. In fact, Google’s saying there’s nothing new or different SEOs or publishers need to worry about. Guidance remains the same, it says: have original, high-quality content. Signals that have been important in the past remain important; Hummingbird just allows Google to process them in new and hopefully better ways.
The primary stated reason for this update is for Google to provide more relevant search results.
Because Hummingbird rewards relevant content (and links), it will enhance both the searching and reading experience.
Past techniques such as keyword density checkers and link builders were frustrating to searchers, readers, and web content writers. Keyword density checkers forced writers to make content that often times felt forced and awkward. Link builders produced ads that interrupted our reading by blocking content or producing audio to ensure we noticed them. 
Now, with Hummingbird, not only will SEO reward more relevant content, it will also make SEO more natural and less forced.
Long ago, Google punished keyword stuffing and encouraged more content per page. Although this probably won’t change, Hummingbird will demand keywords to be better integrated into the content. 
Friends This Updates like Google Panda, Penguin and Hummingbird are great tool to improve our SEO.
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Google Hummingbird